Butchers' Row and its Residents - Addresses

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Below are details of the addresses in Aldgate High Street. For details of the associated individuals, see the article entitled Butchers' Row and its Residents - People.

Introduction

According to press reports, Robert Sagar, who retired as an Inspector in the City of London CID in 1905, suspected a man who worked in Butchers' Row, Aldgate, of having been the murderer.

Butchers' Row referred to a row of butchers' shops on the south side of Aldgate High Street. Sagar's theory was examined in depth in a dissertation by Scott Nelson, The Butcher’s Row Suspect – Was He Jack the Ripper? [Ripperologist, number 84, October 2007]. This article attempts to build on part of that dissertation by collecting evidence about the later history of the men who are known to have lived or run businesses in Butchers' Row in the Autumn of 1888.

In addition to the Post Office Directories, electoral registers, newspapers (particularly the London Gazette and the Jewish Chronicle), censuses and civil registrations of births marriages and deaths, the article draws on the following records held at the London Metropolitan Archives:

  • Poor rate assessment books, St Botolph Aldgate, November 1889-December 1890 [P69/BOT2/C/1/MS02534/853-855].
  • Tithe rate assessment books, St Botolph Aldgate, November 1888-June 1890 [P69/BOT2/C/23/MS02538/10-12].
  • Land tax assessment book, City of London, year ending 24 March 1889 [MS11316/478]
  • Quinquennial valuation list for rate assessment, St Botolph Aldgate, 1891-1896 [P69/BOT2/C/22/MS02550/2].

(N.B. By 1888, the butchers' shops extended only as far west as 62 Aldgate High Street, but for completeness this article covers the whole south side of the street between the junctions with the Minories to the west and Mansell Street to the east. This area was wholly within the City of London, in Portsoken Ward. Most of it lay in the parish of St Botolph Aldgate, but the easternmost buildings were in the parish of St Mary Whitechapel. The parish boundary apparently passed through number 47.)

Addresses

43 Aldgate High Street

The owner was J. Littlefield in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9.

James Edward Littlefield was the tenant in 1888 and was resident there at least between the dates of the 1881 and 1901 censuses.

The house had evidently been demolished by the date of the 1911 census.

44 Aldgate High Street

The owner was J. Boote in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9.

Levy Leuw (trading as Scales and Leuw) was the tenant in 1888 and was resident there at least between the dates of the 1881 and 1891 censuses. He was still the tenant at the date of the 1894-5 electoral register. His son Frank Leuw was resident there at the date of the 1901 census.

Levy's former business partner Ann Scales (the widow of the brother of Levy's wife) also appeared at this address in the 1893-4 and 1894-5 electoral registers.

The house had evidently been demolished by the date of the 1911 census.

45 Aldgate High Street

The owner was Slade in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9.

Joseph Hartwell was the tenant in 1888, and was still listed there in the 1892 Post Office Directory. But there was no entry for this address in the 1892-3, 1893-4 or 1894-5 electoral registers.

[The tenants were shown as Scales and Leuw in the 1888-9 Land Tax assessment, but this may have been an anachronism. They had been carrying on business at 44 and 45 Aldgate High Street in 1884 [London Gazette, 11 March 1884].]

The building was uninhabited at the dates of the 1891 and 1901 censuses.

The 1894 Post Office Directory listed Horwitz and Louisson, meat salesmen, at 45 and 59 and 60 Aldgate High Street.

46 Aldgate High Street

Henry Nathan was the tenant in 1888, and was resident there at least between the dates of the 1881 and 1891 censuses. At the date of the 1901 census his son-in-law William H. Kendall was living there (described as "son-in-law" with the line for the head of household left blank). At the date of the 1911 census - after Henry's death - his daughter Rebecca Kendall was living there (again described as "daughter", with occupation given as "Assisting in Mothers business"; the form had originally been addressed to Mrs Nathan). In July 1925 a partnership between Winifred Nathan and Catherine Nathan, carrying on business as Meatsalesmen, at 46, 50 and 51, Aldgate Market, under the style of Henry Nathan, was dissolved [London Gazette, 16 March 1926].

47 Aldgate High Street

The boundary between the parishes of St Botolph Aldgate and St Mary Whitechapel appears to have passed through this building. Entries for number 47 appear in the sections for both parishes in the electoral registers. In the rate books for St Botolph's parish the property was described as "part of house."

The owner was Newton in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9, but Hill (for "part of house") in the quinquennial valuation list of 1890.

Thomas Alexander Davies was listed as the tenant in the St Botolph Aldgate section of the 1888-9 electoral register, and in both sections in the registers from 1889-90 onwards. He was also listed as the tenant in the rate books and valuation lists for St Botolph's parish from November 1888 onwards. He was later described as of 47, Aldgate High-street, trading as Christopher Hill, Wine and Spirit Merchant [London Gazette, 21 July 1908].

[N.B. Christopher Hill was listed as the tenant in the St Mary Whitechapel section of the 1888-9 electoral register and in the 1888-9 Land Tax assessment, but this may have been an anachronism. Christopher Hill was also listed at this address in the Post Office Directories between at least 1888 and 1894, but this probably refers to Thomas Alexander Davies who, as noted above, was later described as trading as Christopher Hill.]

The census returns for 1881-1911 listed only servants, other employees and visitors.

48 and 49 Aldgate High Street

The owner was St Botolph Aldgate in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9.

Thomas Marshall Brown was the tenant in 1888. He had originally carried on business at this address with William Brown and William Marshall Brown as butchers, under the style of William Brown and Sons. This partnership was dissolved on 24 June 1863, with William Marshall Brown and Thomas Marshall Brown to carry on under the same name [London Gazette, 30 June 1865]. Their partnership was dissolved on 31 July 1870, with Thomas Marshall Brown to carry on alone, still under the same name [London Gazette, 30 August 1870]. But by 1888 he was trading under his own name. He remained the tenant until at least the date of the 1894-5 electoral register. He was described as a carcase butcher or meat salesman.

At the date of the 1881 census Arthur Spurgin, carcase butcher salesman, was living with his family at number 48, and William Morris, butcher, was living with his family at number 49. By late 1881, Arthur Spurgin had moved to Pimlico, where his son Bertram was born [birth registered at St George Hanover Square in the fourth quarter of 1881; birthplace given in 1891 census of 128 Asylum Road, Camberwell]. At the date of the 1891 census William Morris, again described as a butcher and as "employed", and his family were living at 48 and 49 Aldgate High Street. At the date of the 1901 census William Morris, described as a journeyman butcher and as a "worker", and his wife were living at 20 Skelton Rd, West Ham.

50 and 51 Aldgate High Street

The owner was Walter S[ylvester] Gardner in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9 and the November 1889 poor rate.

Matthew Flicker was the tenant in 1888, and remained so until at least the date of the 1894-5 electoral register. He was described as a carcase butcher or meat salesman.

52 Aldgate High Street

The owner was St Botolph Aldgate in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9.

James Tyler was the tenant in 1888, and remained so until at least the date of the 1894-5 electoral register. At the time of his death in 1903 he was described as late of 52 Aldgate High Street and of 301 Camden Road, Middlesex [London Gazette, 6 November 1903]. Described as a carcase butcher or wholesale butcher.

William Lankester was also listed as a carcase butcher at this address in the Post Office Directories for 1888-1890, but not thereafter.

53 and 54 Aldgate High Street

The owner was St Botolph Aldgate in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9. Described in the poor and tithe rate assessments as house, shop and slaughterhouse, and also initially in the valuation list, in which shop and slaughterhouse were later deleted.

Thomas Knott was apparently the tenant until his death in the third quarter of 1888. Described as a carcase butcher. He and John Attfield had been carrying on business as butchers at 159 F, Central Meat Market, City of London, and 53 and 54, Aldgate High Street, but their partnership was dissolved on 20 May, 1888, with Thomas Knott to carry on the business at 53 and 54 Aldgate High Street alone [London Gazette, 22 May 1888]. There appears to have been no entry for the property in the 1888-9 electoral register, but Thomas Knott was shown there in the November 1888 tithe rate assessment and the 1889 Post Office Directory.

Thomas's widow Elizabeth [Frances] was shown as the tenant from May 1889 [tithe rate assessment] to July 1890 [1890-1 electoral register], though she seems to have continued to trade in her late husband's name, as a carcase butcher [Post Office Directory, 1890].

By December 1890 the premises had been taken over by Thomas's sons, William Knott and Edward Thomas Knott [poor rate assessment], the former only being listed in the 1891 Post Office Directory, as a carcase butcher. At the date of the 1891 census, William Knott was living at 53 and 54 Aldgate High Street, described as a meat salesman, "neither employer nor employed," with his wife, family and servant.

William Knott and Edward Thomas Knott continued there until at least the date of the 1893-4 electoral register, but Simon Van der Linde was listed there in the 1894 Post Office Directory, as a meat salesman (there was no entry for the property in the 1894-5 electoral register).

55 Aldgate High Street

The owner was W[alter] S[ylvester] Gardner in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9. Described in the poor and tithe rate assessments as house, shop and slaughterhouse (with an additional shop shown in the poor rate assessments), but simply as a house in the valuation list.

Ambrose Nice and James Hawkins were joint tenants in 1888, according to the electoral registers. They had been trading there as Nice and Hawkins, carcase butchers, from at least the beginning of 1880 [Jewish Chronicle, 30 January 1880], and were still in business there, as wholesale butchers, at the death of Ambrose Nice in March 1906.

James Gibbs Killby was the tenant in 1888 according to the poor rate and tithe rate assessments, the land tax assessment and the valuation list. (In the poor rate assessments Thomas Ambrose Nice and James Hawkins were shown as tenants of a shop at number 55, but this was bracketed together with Killby's house, shop and slaughterhouse at number 56, and Killby was the only one assessed.) Perhaps Nice and Hawkins were subtenants of Killby.

At the date of the 1881 census two houses uninhabited were indicated between numbers 53 and 57. In 1891 numbers 55 and 56 were recorded as a single house uninhabited. In 1901 James Hawkins was living at number 55 with his wife, children and servant, and number 56 was indicated as uninhabited. In 1911 James Hawkins was living at numbers 55 and 56 with his wife and children.

56 Aldgate High Street

The owner was W[alter] S[ylvester] Gardner in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9. Described in the poor and tithe rate assessments as house, shop and slaughterhouse, but simply as a house in the valuation list and land tax assessment.

James Gibbs Killby was the tenant in 1888. He had been at that address since at least April 1884 [London Gazette, 4 April 1884]. He remained the tenant until at least the date of the 1894-5 electoral register, and probably until his death in 1910, when he was described as late of Aldgate High Street, London, and 49, Upper Clapton Road, N.E. [London Gazette, 22 February 1910].

At the date of the 1881 census two houses uninhabited were indicated between numbers 53 and 57. In 1891 numbers 55 and 56 were recorded as a single house uninhabited. In 1901 James Hawkins was living at number 55 with his wife, children and servant, and number 56 was indicated as uninhabited. In 1911 James Hawkins was living at numbers 55 and 56 with his wife and children.

57 Aldgate High Street

The owner was Widmore's Trust in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9.

John Cooke and John Banks were joint tenants in 1888. Cooke had been listed there as a carcase butcher at the beginning of 1880, together with James Kilby [Jewish Chronicle, 30 January 1880]. John T. Banks was living there at the date of the 1881 census. The tithe and poor rate assessments showed them being succeeded as tenants by Frederick Louis Louisson between May and November 1889. The 1890 Post Office Directory listed both Cooke and Banks and F. Lewis Louisson, carcase butcher, at number 57, and the 1890-1 electoral register showed both Thomas Banks and Frederick Lewis Louisson there (the latter as a county elector only). The partnership between John Cooke and John Thomas Banks, trading as Cooke and Banks, wholesale butchers, at 57 Aldgate High Street, was dissolved on 13 November 1890, with debts to be received by Cooke [London Gazette, 18 November 1890]. After that date, only Louisson appeared at number 57.

At the date of the 1881 census John T. Banks was living at 57 Aldgate High Street. In 1891 the house was uninhabited.

58 Aldgate High Street

The owner was Widmore's Trust in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9, but Gassard James and Woolf in the quinquennial valuation list of 1890.

George Bullas was the tenant in 1888. Described as a carcase butcher. Between 3 December 1890 [poor rate assessment] and July 1891 [1891-2 electoral register] he was succeeded as tenant by George Louisson. By July 1892 [1892-3 electoral register] Louisson had in turn been succeeded by Samuel Gluckstein Abrahams, who was listed at this address as a carcase butcher in the 1892 Post Office Directory.

At the date of the 1881 census only a housekeeper and her family were living there. In 1891 the house was uninhabited.

59 Aldgate High Street

Solomon De Leeuw was the tenant in 1888. Described as a meat salesman. Between 28 November 1889 and 20 June 1890 he was succeeded as tenant by Gabriel Horwitz, and then before 3 December 1890 by George Louisson [poor and tithe rate assessments]. There were no entries for this property in the 1890-1 and 1891-2 electoral registers. The 1891 Post Office Directory listed George Louisson and Company, meat salesman, at this address, and he was still shown as the sole tenant in the 1892-3 electoral register. But in the 1893-4 electoral register George Louisson and Gabriel Horwitz were shown as joint tenants of numbers 59 and 60, and the 1894 Post Office Directory listed Horwitz and Louisson, meat salesmen, at numbers 59, 60 and 45. But this partnership, carrying on business as wholesale butchers and meat salesmen at number 59 and 60, and at the Foreign Cattle Market Deptford, was dissolved on 24 September 1895, with Louisson to carry on at number 59 and Horwitz at number 60 [London Gazette, 8 October 1895]. (Horwitz and his then partner Joseph Lialter had been among the creditors of Solomon de Leeuw, in the sum of £16, after he petitioned for bankruptcy in November 1890.)

De Leeuw evidently remained at this address as an employee. At the data of the 1891 census, a butcher, employed, he was living there with his wife, children and a servant.

60 Aldgate High Street

The owner was Widmore's Trust in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9.

George Rayment was the tenant in 1888. Described as a carcase butcher. He was listed there in the 1892 Post Office Directory, but there was no entry for this property in the 1892-3 electoral register, and the 1893-4 register showed Gabriel Horwitz and George Louisson as joint tenants of numbers 59 and 60, with Emanuel Nathan shown in respect of a dwelling house at number 60. The 1894 Post Office Directory listed Horwitz and Louisson, meat salesmen, at numbers 59, 60 and 45. But this partnership, carrying on business as wholesale butchers and meat salesmen at number 59 and 60, and at the Foreign Cattle Market Deptford, was dissolved on 24 September 1895, with Louisson to carry on at number 59 and Horwitz at number 60 [London Gazette, 8 October 1895].

At the date of the 1881 census George Rayment's father Samuel, a carcase butcher, was living at this address with his wife and grandson. In 1891 George Rayment, meat salesman, employer, was living there with his wife, children, sister and servant.

61 Aldgate High Street

This was the address of the Still and Star public house in Harrow Alley, behind Butchers' Row.

62 Aldgate High Street

The owner was the Metropolitan District Railway Company in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9.

Morris Bosman was the tenant in 1888. Described as a meat salesman. From 31 March 1891, the partnership between Morris Bosman and Samuel Gluckstein Abrahams, carrying on business as carcase butchers and meat salesmen at 62 Aldgate High Street under the style of Morris Bosman, was dissolved, with the debts to be received and paid by Bosman [London Gazette, 3 April 1891]. (It is not clear when the partnership was formed; Bosman had been shown as the only tenant as late as the poor rate assessment of 3 December 1890.) Morris Bosman continued to be shown at this address in the Post Office Directories and electoral registers until July 1892 [1892-3 electoral register]. There was no entry for number 62 in the 1893-4 electoral register. The 1894 Post Office Directory listed William Haarer, meat salesman, there, and he was shown in the 1894-5 electoral register, with his residence given as the Cattle Market, Deptford.

At the date of the 1891 census, Morris Bosman, meat salesman, employer, was living with his wife, children and servants at number 62.

63-75 Aldgate High Street

In 1888 number 62 was the last house in Butchers' Row proper. At the date of the 1881 census the butchers' shops had continued as far as number 75, but most of these buildings had been demolished when the new underground line was constructed in 1882. In the 1891 census numbers 63-75 were represented by a single uninhabited house identified as "London and North Western Railway Company" (number 65).

63 Aldgate High Street

The 1888 Post Office Directory listed, at numbers 63-65, Inland Revenue Office, and Salvage Office (David Stevenson, superintendent), but these did not appear in subsequent years.

The 1888 Directory also listed three other businesses at this address:

(1) Joseph Nunneley and Company, brewers. This company continued to be listed here until at least 1892. Presumably the company of the Joseph Nunneley who was born in Leicester, c. 1813, was resident in Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire, in 1861, described as a brewer and malster employing 14 men and 2 boys, and in Clevedon, Somerset, in 1881, described as a railway etc shareholder, and whose death was registered at Warwick in the first quarter of 1889.

(2) A. B. Walker and Sons, brewers. This company continued to be listed here until 1891. The company of Sir Andrew Barclay Walker (1824-1893), based in Liverpool.

(3) Lyon Brothers Limited, glass bottle manufacturers. This company continued to be listed here until 1890. It was based at St Helen's, Lancashire, and with another business had been carried on in partnership between Job Henry Lyon and William Lyon; the partnership was dissolved in 1875, with Job Henry Lyon to carry on this company under the same name [London Gazette, 5 November 1875]. It was resolved at an Extraordinary General Meeting of the company in Liverpool on 24 October 1890 to wind it up, as it could not continue by reason of its liabilities [London Gazette, 28 October 1890].

65 Aldgate High Street

General Booking and Inquiry Office of the London and North Western Railway [Post Office Directories; tithe rate assessments]. Uninhabited at the date of the 1891 census.

76 and 77 Aldgate High Street

The owner of number 76 was Thompson in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9.

Trespole Henry Myers was the tenant in 1888. Listed in the Post Office Directories, 1888-1891, as Trespole Henry Myers, dining rooms. Between 20 June and 3 December 1890 he was succeeded as tenant by Joseph Weil [poor rate assessments]. Weil remained the tenant until his death, 24 September 1911, after which he was described as a hotel proprietor, late of 11 Finsbury Park Road and Aldgate Hotel, 76 and 77 High Street, Aldgate [London Gazette, 15 December 1911 and 11 March 1921].

At the date of the 1891 census Joseph Weil, hotel proprietor, was living at this address with his family, servants, employees and boarders. Among the servants was Trespole H. Myers, hotel and restaurant manager, employed. In 1901 Joseph Weil, hotel proprietor, was still living there, with his son Sam described as hotel manager.

78 Aldgate High Street

This was the Rose and Crown public house. Richard Milchard was listed here in the 1888 Post Office Directory (and in the 1888-9 land tax assessment), and Jane Vancolle was listed in the 1889 Post Office Directory. By 28 November 1889 Woolf Hart was the tenant [poor rate assessment].

79 Aldgate High Street

The owner was Deputy East in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9. This was Samuel East junior, a deputy alderman of the City of London, late of the Three Nuns Tavern, Aldgate, who died 1 March 1888 [London Gazette, 22 August 1890]. Described as a shop in the poor rate assessment and the valuation list, but a house in the land tax assessment.

Joseph Levy was the tenant in 1888. Described as a tailor. In the electoral registers his address was given as 5 Victoria Park Road until July 1890, but as 1 Minories thereafter. He remained the tenant until at least July 1894 [1894-5 electoral register], and presumably later, as he was still living at 1 Minories in 1901.

Apparently the house was uninhabited at the dates of the 1891 and 1901 censuses.

The poor rate assessment for 28 November 1889 also shows "rooms over shops", 79, 80 and 81 Aldgate High Street and 1 Minories, of which the tenants were Jane East [the widow of Samuel East junior] and George Zoller. Subsequently the first name was deleted and 'E' (for empty?) was written, apparently beside both names.

80 and 81 Aldgate High Street

The owner was the Metropolitan Railway Company in the Land Tax assessment for 1888-9. Described as a shop in the poor rate assessment and the valuation list, but a house in the land tax assessment.

John Goodman was the tenant in 1888. Described as a hosier. In the electoral registers his address was given as 2 Horton Road, Hackney. He was still listed there by the 1889 Post Office Directory, but by 28 November 1889 he had been succeeded by Joseph Levy [poor rate assessment], who was shown in subsequent electoral registers as the tenant of numbers 79, 80 and 81. He was described in the Post Office Directories as a hosier. He remained the tenant until at least July 1894 [1894-5 electoral register], and presumably later, as he was still living at 1 Minories in 1901.

Apparently the house was uninhabited at the dates of the 1891 and 1901 censuses.